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Biased and superficial Science Fiction reviews

           
     
The Rituals Of Infinity

Copyright 1965 by Michael Moorcock

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SOJALS rating:     
one SOJALS point one SOJALS point one SOJALS point no SOJALS point no SOJALS point    Very good (3/5)

I first read this in 1972 and most recently on the 29th December 2011

You might think you live in the real, the one and only Earth, but that may not be true. There are more than one Earth out there. As of today there are fifteen other Earths. Each cocooned in subspace. Each looking pretty much geologically like the real thing. E1 is the most up to date - for the others history appears to have stopped at earlier dates - for E2 it is the 1960s. On some of the Earths history appear to have take an entirely different path.

Dr Faulstaff's father discovered these parallel worlds. He also discovered that unknown forces were attempting to destroy them. Faulstaff now leads an organization in a struggle these dark forces, known the D-squads. But he's losing the fight, and slowly but surely the Earths are being destroyed.

Okay, okay, a great tale of imagination, adventure and buoyant enthusiasm for life. Reminds you why it's so worthwhile reading Michael Moorcock. He's a great story-teller and his characters will sweep you up on a wonderful and exciting ride. I can see I need to read more Moorcock. Well, actually I've read a lot of Moorcock, but he's a prolific writer (also publisher* and musician**) and I largely skipped all his swords-and-sorcery novels.

This was also published as the "Wrecks Of Earth" along with "Tramontane" in an ACE Double.

*"New Worlds" for more than 25 years.

**Michael Moorcock & The Deep Fix ‎– "The New Worlds Fair" (amazingly I have this vinyl), Hawkwind and Spirits Burning amongst others.

Loaded on the 22nd December 2020.
    
Cover of The Rituals Of Infinity

Reviews of other works by Michael Moorcock:
Behold the Man
Mother London